Author Topic: Environmental Working Group releases 'Dirty Dozen' pesticide report  (Read 255 times)

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Environmental Working Group releases 'Dirty Dozen' pesticide report
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2016, 01:52:02 PM »
Strawberries Contain the Most Pesticide Residue of 50 Grocery Items

Environmental Working Group releases 'Dirty Dozen' pesticide report

“Americans eat nearly 8 pounds of fresh strawberries a year—and with them, dozens of pesticides, including chemicals that have been linked to cancer and reproductive damage or are banned in Europe,” according to a statement by EWG’s Bill Walker and Sonya Lunder.

In California, where most domestic strawberries are grown, each acre is treated with 300 pounds of pesticides, according to EWG.

“Strawberries tested by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2009 and 2014 bore an average of 5.75 different pesticides per sample, compared to 1.74 pesticides per sample for all other produce, according to a new EWG analysis,” the statement said.
USDA’s 2014 Findings for Strawberries

        Almost all samples—98 percent—had detectable residues of at least one pesticide.
        Some 40 percent had residues of 10 or more pesticides.
        The dirtiest strawberry sample had residues of 17 different pesticides.
        Strawberry growers used 60 different pesticides in various combinations.

Nearly three-fourths of the 6,953 produce samples tested by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2014 contained pesticide residues, according to the EWG website.

EWG’s Full List for 2016

The items are listed from the highest amount of pesticide residue (strawberries) down to the lowest (avocados).

    Strawberries
    Apples
    Nectarines
    Peaches
    Celery
    Grapes
    Cherries
    Spinach
    Tomatoes
    Sweet bell peppers
    Cherry tomatoes
    Cucumbers
    Snap peas (imported)
    Blueberries (domestic)
    Potatoes
    Hot peppers
    Lettuce
    Kale and collard greens
    Blueberries (imported)
    Green beans
    Plums
    Pears
    Raspberries
    Carrots
    Winter squash
    Tangerines
    Summer squash
    Snap peas (domestic)
    Green onions
    Bananas
    Oranges
    Watermelon
    Broccoli
    Sweet potatoes
    Mushrooms
    Cauliflower
    Cantaloupe
    Grapefruit
    Honeydew melon
    Eggplant
    Kiwi
    Papayas
    Mangos
    Asparagus
    Onions
    Sweet peas, frozen
    Cabbage
    Pineapples
    Sweet corn
    Avocados

Grow your own or purchase from local producers that you can ask about their growing practices!

Herman Beck-Chenoweth