Author Topic: YUCCA: Nature’s self-contained possibles bag!  (Read 1502 times)

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Offline Little Feather

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Re: YUCCA: Nature’s self-contained possibles bag!
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2012, 03:25:33 AM »
More about this amazing plant:


Distribution
Distribution of the capsular fruited species in southwest, midwest USA, Mexico's Baja California and Canada,

overview
The natural distribution range of the genus Yucca (49 species and 24 subspecies) covers a vast area of North and Central America. From Baja California in the west, northwards into the southwestern United States, through the drier central states as far north as Alberta in Canada (Yucca glauca ssp. albertana), and moving east along the Gulf of Mexico, and then north again, through the Atlantic coastal and inland neighbouring states. To the south, the genus is represented throughout Mexico and extends into Guatemala (Yucca guatemalensis). Yuccas have adapted to an equally vast range of climatic and ecological conditions. They are to be found in rocky deserts and badlands, in prairies and grassland, in mountainous regions, in light woodland, in coastal sands (Yucca filamentosa), and even in subtropical and semitemperate zones, although these are generally arid to semiarid.

Ecology
Yuccas have a very specialized, mutualistic pollination system, being pollinated by yucca moths (family Prodoxidae); the insect purposefully transfers the pollen from the stamens of one plant to the stigma of another, and at the same time lays an egg in the flower; the moth larva then feeds on some of the developing seeds, always leaving enough seed to perpetuate the species. Yucca species are the host plants for the caterpillars of the yucca giant-skipper (Megathymus yuccae),[5] ursine giant-skipper (Megathymus ursus),[6] and Strecker's giant-skipper (Megathymus streckeri).[7]
Large Joshua tree with thick trunk at Grapevine Springs Ranch, AZ

Uses
Yuccas are widely grown as ornamental plants in gardens. Many species also bear edible parts, including fruits, seeds, flowers, flowering stems,[8] and more rarely roots. References to yucca root as food often stem from confusion with the similarly spelled, but botanically unrelated, yuca, also called cassava (Manihot esculenta). Roots of soaptree yucca (Yucca elata) are high in saponins and are used as a shampoo in Native American rituals. Dried yucca leaves and trunk fibers have a low ignition temperature, making the plant desirable for use in starting fires via friction.[9] In rural Appalachian areas, species such as Yucca filamentosa are referred to as "meat hangers". The tough, fibrous leaves with their sharp-spined tips were used to puncture meat and knotted to form a loop with which to hang meat for salt curing or in smoke houses.

Cultivation
Yuccas are widely planted in the western US as a landscape plant. Most species generally tolerate heat and cold, requiring little care and low water. They offer a dramatic accent to a landscape design.

Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia) are protected by law in some states. A permit is needed for wild collection. As a landscape plant, they can be killed by excessive water during their summer dormant phase, so are avoided by landscape contractors.

Organic seeds grown by The Farm at Nature's Pace Sanctuary are available from Back40Books.com:
http://www.back40books.com/i/1650/yucca-glauca-seed-packet.htm



yucca, yucca seeds, Yucca glauca, cordage, soap making, soapwort, yucca for food, The Farm at Nature's Pace Sanctuary,
Back40Books.com, yucca edible parts, yucca sandels
« Last Edit: November 12, 2012, 08:40:36 AM by Little Feather »

Offline Little Feather

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YUCCA: Nature’s self-contained possibles bag!
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2012, 03:53:05 AM »


YUCCA: Nature’s self-contained possibles bag! Few plants are as versatile Yucca glauca: You can use it for food, sandal making, cordage, soap, food and even clothing. This plant grows quickly and will perform well in zone 4 and warmer. Now you can obtain organic seeds for this marvelous and useful plant from our own Nature’s Pace Sanctuary Farm for the low price of $3.95 per packet of 20 seeds. The seeds come with complete planting and care instructions and the plants are a versatile ornamental addition to your property as well as being useful. Seeds are available year around.

Available now at Back40Books.com; Click the link to go directly to the page:  http://www.back40books.com/i/1650/yucca-glauca-seed-packet.htm